Fractal Flames

I just completed my latest experiment 🙂 It is a revamped Web version of Orion Sky Lawlor’s “GPU-Accelerated Rendering of Unbounded Nonlinear Iterated Function System Fixed Points” (see here).
screenshot
For good measure I have added a bit of music interaction 🙂 I suggest you have a look at the live demo here (Chrome recommended). A Youtube recording can be found here.

The music I selected above is by Dexter Britain and licensed under a Creative Commons license. (see www.dexterbritain.co.uk)


Programming background information:

  • Starting from Dr. Lawlors opengl/C++/Windows program the main step was to get rid of any opengl legacy fixed pipeline rendering and replace it with a programmable pipeline WEBGL equivalent. Then some WEBGL limitations still had to be dealt with, e.g. adding missing WEBGL shader functions, replacement of unsupported for-loops in shaders or unsupported texture modes, etc. Luckily this process proved easier than expected. The resulting WEBGL/JavaScipt program works quite fluidly in Chome (on my GXT460). Firefox’s WEBGL implementation also works for the most part – but it occasionally it crashes for no good reason and it is rather slow in compiling the shaders.
  • Some surprise obstacles came with the attempt to implement the music playback and hook it up WebAudio’s AnalizerNode infrastructure: The first attempt to use some XMLHttpRequest based loading with AudioContext.decodeAudioData() processing proved a total failure, because Firefox’s implementation (versions 31 -33) just fails to decode the (supposedly “invalid”) mp3 data. Also it became obvious that the upfront decoding of the complete mp3 file (in Chrome) adds an unacceptable delay to the music startup. Interestingly playback of the same mp3 file works flawlessly in Chrome as well as in Firefox when using the HTMLAudioElement. So that’s what I am using now. Unfortunately that API is not implemented consistently in the different browsers and particularily the event handling in Firefox leaves a lot to be desired. But even Chrome fails to properly “loop” a song but instead goes into some corrupt state at the end of some (especially longer) songs. Once again browser specific tinkering is called for…
  • The page uses multiple AnaylzerNodes with low-/band- and high-pass filters to detect certain music patterns that are then reflected in the graphics. Unfortunately Firefox again proved a difficult customer: Connecting FilterNodes to the HTMLAudioElement here sporadically leads to corrupted music playback. Also the Firefox FilterNodes produce completely different results than the Chrome ones.
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Posted on August 4, 2014, in JavaScript, PHP, Web programming, WebAudio, WEBGL. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

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